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Who Should Be Responsible For Survivorship Care? An Question In Search Of An Answer

Survivorship has become a very important part of cancer care as more and more of us survive a longer time. If our cancer has gone into remission we still need additional care, both physical and mental care. An unanswered question in today’s healthcare delivery system is who should be providing the care, a primary care [...]

By |2016-01-20T15:00:57-05:00January 20th, 2016|Advanced Prostate Cancer, survivorship, Uncategorized|0 Comments

For Men with Prostate Cancer Does Being Married or Partnered Extend Your Life, A Myth Shattered

I just returned, along with Malecare’s Executive Director Darryl Mitteldorf and Dr. Wendy Lebowitz, from the ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in San Francisco. The three of us often attend this meeting, but this one had a new and very special item, a research poster (abstract no. 253) that was presented by Malecare and Mitteldorf. The [...]

A Look Behind the Statistics Showing the Prostate Cancer Disparities Faced by Men of African Origin

Men of African origin are disproportionately affected by prostate cancer. You can read more Malecare's African American men and Prostate Cancer website, Twice As Many  http://twiceasmany.org Three specific statistics tell the story. 1- In the United States, the incidence of prostate cancer is highest among men of African origin. 2- Prostate cancer mortality is highest among [...]

Depression In Men Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT)

It is commonly known that men on Hormone Therapy (ADT) often experience many physical and psychological side effects from the treatment. Many of my posts have discussed the physical side effects, but I have not adequately explored the adverse psychological  side effects that many of us experience when we are on ADT! Besides memory issues [...]

Perhaps My Most Important Post

As we reach this holiday season I want to remind you that Malecare has been working to help you and your family survive longer and have a better quality of life. We have helped you in ways that you are aware of; like through this blog and by the Malecare Advanced Prostate Cancer Online Support Group. [...]

Updated Analysis Confirms That Adherence To A Strict Mediterranean Diet Is Correlated To Longer Cancer Survival For Many Cancers, Including Prostate Cancer

Go to any support group meeting and you are almost sure to hear someone, usually a new member of the group, ask about what they might do to lower their risk of having their prostate cancer progress or even lower their risk of dying from the prostate cancer. Among the common answer to this question [...]

Avoiding Increased Colon Cancer Risk Created By Errors Made in a Colonoscopy

Having been diagnosed with prostate cancer does not make you immune to developing another cancer. Look specifically at me; I have now been diagnosed with five different, primary cancers. Not only do we remain susceptible to developing another, unrelated primary cancer, we also are at an increased risk of developing a secondary cancer that is [...]

Perioperative Complications following Artificial Urinary Sphincter Placement After Prostate Cancer Surgery

Urinary incontinence post-prostatectomy is a too common complaint from men. Although the actual degree of incontinence suffered ranges from being minor, or a simple and small amount of post urination dribble, to a complete and total inability to control any urine flow, the most bothersome issues that significantly affects a man’s quality of life (QoL) [...]

The Need To Expand Research Into Pre-hab Therapy Prior To Cancer Treatment

There is a lot of evidence that pre-treatment rehabilitation (prehabilitation or pre-hab) both speeds up and benefits a patient’s recovery after surgical orthopedic treatment for knee and hip replacement as well as cardiac conditions. Having pre-hab, which is often covered by insurance after orthopedic surgery, is pretty standard. Now, based on an article published in [...]

Remembering Andrew And Learning From A 28 Year Old Wise Man

Yesterday, my younger son Max, who is 28 years old, went to the funeral of a fraternity brother. Actually, the young man, Andrew, had been a member of his pledge class at the University of Michigan. Andrew, who was also 28 years old, died of Pediatric Brain Cancer.  Andrew had battled this disease for over [...]

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