Choosing your treatment team

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A diagnosis of prostate cancer can be overwhelming. WebMD has several articles that will help make your interactions with your physicians easier.

The more you know about your cancer treatment, the more confident you’ll feel. So when you meet with specialists, go in with specific cancer questions.

To give you a start, here are some questions about cancer treatment to ask your medical oncologist, surgeon, and radiation oncologist. Not every person will need all three types of cancer specialists. However, these cancer questions will help prepare you no matter your medical needs. Print them out before your next appointment with your cancer specialist.

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After you’ve been diagnosed with cancer and your doctor has outlined your treatment, you may still have a nagging doubt: what if my doctor is wrong? No matter how much you like or trust your oncologist, it’s natural to wonder if something was missed or if a new treatment is available. If you have any doubts, get a second opinion.

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Cancer is a complex and tricky disease, so you may need to see several different cancer specialists during your treatment. Treatment often involves the combined care of several cancer specialists at once.

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When you think of cancer support and treatment, you probably think of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. But there’s a lot more to fighting cancer than destroying cancer cells.

During cancer treatment, you need to eat well and keep a healthy weight. You need to know where to turn with questions about your treatment or its side effects. You might need help coping with the emotional impact of cancer. So while you might not usually think of a dietitian or a social worker or therapist as important cancer support, they often are.

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Medical expertise is a key part of your cancer treatment. But it won’t be enough. To get through this, you’ll also need to build a cancer support team at home with your family and friends.

Having good cancer support at home is crucial. “A cancer diagnosis adds an enormous amount of stress to a person’s life,” says Harold J. Burstein, MD, a staff oncologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. “But people who have strong social supports — good friends and family — tend to cope much better.”

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By | 2017-10-19T10:59:16+00:00 September 29th, 2007|Tools for Activists, Treatment News|0 Comments

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