This guide is designed for both lay people and health professionals who conduct group-training sessions with community and scientific audiences. It offers practical suggestions for trainers to enliven training programs, encourage more active participation, and enrich the learning experience for everyone involved. Includes worksheets to help both individuals and organizations plan training programs. http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/resources/trainers-guide-cancer-education

Resource designed to help individuals and organizations find ways to
participate and engage your community in clinical trials outreach and
education activities. Includes worksheets and a Plan for Action to help
both individuals and organizations plan outreach efforts.
http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/resources/outreach-education-advocacy

Videos available from NCI please call 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237), 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday; TTY
1-800-332-8615

Cancer Trials… Because Lives Depend On It
Video that discusses prevention and treatment clinical trials to create
general awareness about them. (10 minutes; includes discussion guide)

Cancer Clinical Trials: An Introduction for Patients and Their Families
Video that discusses treatment clinical trials for patients and their
families who may be considering participation. (18 minutes; including
discussion guide)

Anyone participating in a clinical trial in the United States is
required to sign an “informed consent” form. This form details the
nature of the study, the risks involved, and what may happen to a
patient in the study. The informed consent tells patients that they have
a right to leave the study at any time.
http://www.centerwatch.com/bookstore/freeresearch.html

Slide Programs on CD-ROM please call 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237), 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday; TTY
1-800-332-8615

Cancer Clinical Trials: The Basics
Slide presentation that covers the topics included in Cancer Clinical
Trials: The Way We Make Progress Against Cancer, plus phases of clinical trials, randomization, types of trials, protocols, and barriers to
participation. (27-slide PowerPoint presentation with talking points)

Cancer Clinical Trials: The Way We Make Progress Against Cancer
Slide presentation that covers the basics about clinical trials–what
they are, who takes part, different types of trials, protecting
patients’ safety, risks and benefits of trials, and where to find
trials. (13-slide PowerPoint presentation with talking points)

Cancer Clinical Trials: In-Depth Information
Slide presentation that covers the topics included in Cancer Clinical
Trials: The Way We Make Progress Against Cancer, plus phases of clinical
trials, randomization, randomization, types of trials, protocols, and
barriers to participation. (27-slide PowerPoint presentation with
talking points)

Clinical Trials Slide Programs in Spanish/ Programas de láminas sobre
estudios clínicos

La historia de José
A fotonovela-style introductory Spanish-language presentation that takes
you on the journey of José, a man who is given the option of enrolling
in a prevention clinical trial. The second presentation follows the same
story with a female subject. For general audiences who are not familiar
with clinical trials.

La historia de Ana
A fotonovela-style introductory Spanish-language presentation that takes
you on the journey of Ana, a woman who is given the option of enrolling
in a treatment clinical trial. The second presentation follows the same
story with a male subject. For general audiences who are not familiar
with clinical trials.

Conversemos un rato
A Spanish-language slide presentation that covers the basics about
clinical trials–what they are, who takes part, different types of
trials, protecting patients’ safety, risks and benefits of trials, where
to find trials, and issues of concern to Latino audiences. Appropriate
for community leaders and health care providers.

If You Have Cancer: What You Should Know About Clinical Trials
http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/resources/what-to-know-about-trials

If You Have Cancer and Have Medicare… You Should Know About Clinical
Trials
http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/resources/medicare-and-cancer-trials

Taking Part in Clinical Trials: What Cancer Patients Need to Know
http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/resources/taking-part-treatment-trials
Also available in Spanish version.
https://cissecure.nci.nih.gov/ncipubs/details.asp?pid=756

Taking Part in Clinical Trials: Cancer Prevention Studies
http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/resources/taking-part-prevention-trials
Also available in Spanish Version.
https://cissecure.nci.nih.gov/ncipubs/details.asp?pid=724

If You Want To Find Ways To Prevent Cancer…Learn About Prevention
Clinical Trials
http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/learning/about-prevention-trials

Read this document if you are considering a clinical trial
http://www.cancer.org/docroot/ETO/content/ETO_6_3_Clinical_Trials_-_Patient_Participation.asp

AccessWatch is a new web-based information clearinghouse designed to inform lawmakers how recent changes in Medicare funding for cancer care are affecting patients and their access to community cancer care.

Concerned Members of Congress have asked the cancer community to gather information regarding any impact the Medicare Modernization Act has on cancer care. AccessWatch was created to provide a forum where the cancer community can come together to respond to this request.

Printable pdf to educate people http://www.cancertrialshelp.org/pdfs/accessWatch.pdf

Website http://www.accesswatch.org/

Slide presentation on clinical trials
http://www.ncipoet.org/docs/28

HealthCareCoach.com is a project of the National Health Law Program
NHeLP), a non-profit legal organization. The site will help consumers
access quality health care, and educate them about their legal rights
and provide information and policy advocacy.

Learn strategies to help you manage the physical and emotional
responsibilities of caregiving, find home health services, identify
community resources and sustain yourself as a caregiver.
http://www.canceradvocacy.org/resources/essential/

The process of new drug development has many parts. In the United States, until a drug has been approved by the FDA, it can generally be obtained only through several mechanisms: enrollment in a clinical trial studying the drug, an expanded access program or special exemption/compassionate use programs. This series of questions and answers addresses some of the issues surrounding access to drugs that are still considered investigational or under study.
http://www.acor.org/clinical/indaccess.html

Quick Drug Information

This database provides a summarized glance at concise drug information
including proper usage, precautions, interaction warnings, and side
effects for prescription and non-prescription drugs.
http://tinyurl.com/9uoo7

Today, many people benefit from the findings of cancer prevention and
treatment clinical trials. With the additional resources provided
through the DoD/NCI cancer clinical trials agreement, you and your
doctor can make the best choice for your health care

http://www.tricare.osd.mil/cancertrials/patients.cfm

Evaluation Of Randomized Controlled Trials
M.J.McKeown, MD, FACOG, FACS
Objective and Ethics
Outcome Measures
Interventions
Study Population And Sample Size
Checklist For Appraising Randomized Trials

http://www.cancerlynx.com/trialcheck.html

For in depth information on how the clinical trial system works, see http://www.cancerguide.org/clinical_trials.html
Understanding The Clinical Trial System.